CES at Frostburg State University

CES at Frostburg State University brings national and international performing artists and audiences together to experience and celebrate the arts. CES prides itself on offering programming that appeals to a diverse audience providing something for everyone. The annual season runs from September through May and includes classical music, jazz performers, Grammy winners, Broadway-style musical theatre, classical theatre, holiday shows, dance and family entertainment.

Upcoming Events
LIVE! at StarScape: Cyrille Aimee February 10, 2017 - 7:30 PM

On The EDGE: Daniel Davis March 2, 2017 - 8:15 PM

Tibetan Monks Mandala Sand Painting March 5, 2017 to March 9, 2017

A lecture, “Symbolism of the Sand Mandala,” detailing the significance of sand paintings, will be held Sunday, March 5 at 5 p.m. in the FSU Lane University Center Atkinson Room. In the hour-long lecture, the monks’ spiritual director Geshe Lobsang Tenzin Negi will discuss how the mandala is used as an object of contemplation.

Tibetan Sand Mandala Creation March 5, 2017 to March 9, 2017

Tibetan Buddhist monks from Drepung Loseling Monastery will construct a Mandala Sand Painting Sunday, March 5 to Thursday, March 9 in the Frostburg State University Lewis J. Ort Library. The process of sand painting is one of the Buddhism’s most exquisite artistic traditions. Millions of grains of sand are painstakingly laid on a flat platform over a period of days to form the image of a mandala. Over the years, the monks have created sand paintings in more than 100 museums, art centers and universities throughout the United States and Europe. The process is said to effect purification and healing on three levels. The outer level represents the world in its divine form; the inner level represents a map by which the ordinary human mind is transformed into enlightenment; and the secret level depicts the balance of the subtle energies of the body and the clear light dimension of the mind. An opening ceremony takes place on Sunday, March 5 at 3 p.m. when the lamas consecrate the site and call forth the forces of goodness through chanting, music and mantra recitation. The lamas then begin the process by drawing an outline of the mandala on the wooden platform. Over the following days, they lay colored sands through traditional metal funnels called a chakpur. A closing ceremony will be held on Thursday, March 9 at 12 p.m. Traditionally, sand mandalas are destroyed shortly after completion. This is done as a metaphor for the impermanence of life. The sands are swept up and placed in an urn. To fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water to be scattered. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean; from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing. A lecture, “Symbolism of the Sand Mandala,” detailing the significance of sand paintings, will be held Sunday, March 5 at 5 p.m. in the FSU Lane University Center Atkinson Room. In the hour-long lecture, the monks’ spiritual director Geshe Lobsang Tenzin Negi will discuss how the mandala is used as an object of contemplation.

Lecture: Symbolism of the Sand Mandala March 5, 2017 - 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM

This event takes place as part of a five-day residency with the Tibetan Monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery.

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