Pendragon, Victoria

Pendragon, Victoria

Victoria Pendragon trained since a child to be an artist, first in Saturday classes at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and finally at the Philadelphia College of Art, I did not begin my first foray into the real art world until the mid 1980's and then, as half of a collaborative artist known as Victoria+Dodd. We did comparatively well as an artist and our work found its way into a number of corporate collections. We also wrote and lectured for Artist's Magazine on marketing for artists.

In 1988 through 1989 I experienced the crippling of my whole body and the hardening of my internal organs due to progressive systemic sclerosis. Art - and pretty much everything else - stopped for me as I embarked on an adventure that would first save and then change my life. My very unlikely recovery led me towards work where I could be of assistance to others and art took a back seat for many years.

In 2008, following a divorce from my collaborator, I began to feel the irrepressible urge to create and that urge found its expression first in collage, then in painting on silk and finally emerged in a meeting of mediums, in which I layer painted silk with collage as well as found and created objects. My focus is almost always energy.

I became acquainted with the various manifestations of energy during my years of healing as I explored one after another so-called alternative methods in that there was - and is - no known cure for scleroderma. During that time I also became acutely aware of the role that feelings play in the body and in the way that they affect the energy of the body. In my work, I strive to create pieces that inspire feelings in the viewer, allowing the feelings, rather than, necessarily, the visual 'information' to evoke response.

The media I have chosen is somewhat challenging for me as my own standards require a certain level of precision and my hands, the only remaining clue to my former condition, bent inward, and then inward once more, are not the most precise of tools. Just picking up a piece of paper involves what feels like more work than it ought. I use a hemostat - or two- for placing smaller pieces... and there are always lots of smaller pieces! I use pins and toothpicks and whatever might be handy for finger stand-ins and I ruin more things than I'd like to. But it's marvelous. I am so much more pleased with this work than with any I've done before... probably because I've found my niche... reflecting the energy of the life force through my art.

Currently I reside in Paw Paw, West Virginia with my husband and two cats.